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New York may consider prohibiting smartphones in classrooms

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Rochester, New York – New York school classrooms may soon look different.

Governor Kathy Hochul is advocating for the state-wide prohibition of smartphones in classrooms. Students would only be permitted to carry phones with no Internet connection due to the change.
Parents and children have provided input on the proposed change, which is now just a suggestion, but they are interested in what the future may bring.

Hochul attributes the deterioration in young people’s mental health to social media corporations. Children who are now enrolled in school are all too familiar with it.

“It’s the people that misuse it or just listen to the wrong people,” said local seventh-grade student London Orlins. “They feel bad because some people might bully them for things that they do because they show too much.”

Students believe that always carrying a smartphone with them is essential, even with all of the potential dangers that social media presents.

“I definitely agree that we shouldn’t be using them in class,” said local seventh-grade student Gianna Crawford. “But if something were to happen and we needed to contact our parents, I feel like we should have them.”

Abby Griffin, a local parent and teacher, is not always in need of that. She believes there are lots of resources available for the students to reach their parents in an emergency.

“I don’t really see a benefit to having it,” Griffin said. “Students already have access to laptops and iPads that are given by the schools right now, so I think that’s plenty.”

Griffin thinks that although communication is vital, it can also be a daily hindrance.

“I think from a parents standpoint, as my kids get older, I think, yes, it’s nice to be able to contact them, but there’s really no need to contact them throughout the day,” Griffin said.

Hochul is even suggesting that kids carry flip phones so they may make emergency calls and send texts. The proposed concept may be discussed during the upcoming January legislative session in the state.

 

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